intotheomelette

cvilbrandt:

archiemcphee:

Self-taught Alaskan sculptor Lee Cross, known professionally as Wood Splitter Lee, creates incredible one of a kind fantasy creatures that are so remarkably lifelike they verge on creepy, which is just one of the things that makes them so awesome. All of Lee’s creatures are completely made by hand without the use of and patterns, molds or casts. Their bodies contain articulated skeletons wrapped with stuffing, making them very soft to handle and fully posable. They’re decorated with carefully hand-applied synthetic fur and paint. As you can see from these photos, some of Lee’s creatures are more fantastic in nature than others, but they’re all amazing to behold.

Lee’s creatures are available for purchase through weekly Auction Adoptions held on eBay.

To check out more of her phenomenal handmade creatures, visit Wood Splitter Lee’s DeviantArt gallery.

[via DeMilked]

Hnnnngh can I be rich now please

theartassignment

let-it-be-extraordinary:

Art Assignment #10

Make a rug

My grandmother was a hoarder. But mum threw out most of the old fabric. So I used her wool to make a blanket instead.

I was thinking about the concept of randomness. How all natural things came into being unpredictably and without intension. Yet human observation has found a way to categorise and sort the randomness into patterns. We knot things together as though they used the same stitch when made, the same finger knitting technique for the same arbitrary shape. And if I had picked the wool out of the bag in a truly random way it would have looked - to us - like a design, like a predetermined order. And I wanted to avoid that.

So this blanket is formed out of intensional disorder. The strict regime I set myself had one rule: no repetition.

Despite this rule, it’s the same knot over and over again in a (mostly) uniform circle, spiralling outwards. I still carefully selected only acrylic wool. And when I take it out of the house, I am repeatedly asked the same question: “How long did it take?” and I repeatedly answer the same way: “An inadvisable amount of time, but not as long as you’d think.”

I feel like Schoenberg. His attempt to reinvent music through 12-tone melodies had the same strict ruling: no repetition. Yet if he wanted his music to resonate with audiences he still had to be confined by the standard metre, the standard note values and the standard instrumentation. The same sentimentally meaningless shapes, imbued with the creator’s own sentimental meaning.

Most of the wool was found around my house, some of it found in opportunity shops for 60c a ball and some of it was graciously given to me by friends. The white circle used to be an itchy cardigan that belonged to my mum. And the multicoloured pink wool was left over from a hat my Nana made for me.

Q: “How big are you gonna make it?”

A: “How long is a piece of string?” 

knottybearknits

Brickless

needleemporium:

image

Pattern: Brickless (pattern purchased on Ravelry)

Yarn: 4 skeins of Mrs. Crosby Steamer Trunk in the colour Flame-Colored Tanger

Berlin in Winter is colder than most other big German cities – when travelling there, a big, cozy shawlette like this will come in handy! The beautiful colors are reminiscent of bright city lights in dark winter nights. The shape of the shawlette is an asymmetrical, long triangle, formed by rows that are getting longer and longer as you go. They are worked in different simple, but very effective patterns that make them look a little like a skyline of tall houses. These skyscrapers are not built with bricks, but concrete and steel – hence the name, „Brickless“.

image

filltheairupwithlove
filltheairupwithlove:

I finally finished it!
And then I swore to myself that I would learn to do some sort of crochet joining because weaving in ends after sewing up all those squares me question whether or not I actually like crocheting squares.
Still, I love how this turned out.  COLORS!  And now I also keep thinking about chocolates ever since Savannah’s mom mentioned it.  Such a good blanket.

filltheairupwithlove:

I finally finished it!

And then I swore to myself that I would learn to do some sort of crochet joining because weaving in ends after sewing up all those squares me question whether or not I actually like crocheting squares.

Still, I love how this turned out.  COLORS!  And now I also keep thinking about chocolates ever since Savannah’s mom mentioned it.  Such a good blanket.

oldsampeabody

oldsampeabody:

Making progress on my Falling Water scarf! This is my first time working with a lace pattern, and it’s proving to be quite fun. I think it will make for a lovely fall scarf once I’m done with it—whenever that is.

(Only…now I am wondering if I should do four repeats of the pattern instead of three. Is it too narrow? Hm. It’s around 6-6.5 inches wide right now, but will probably get wider once it’s blocked—and I’ve heard that this particular yarn expands quite a bit. Common sense tells me that the only way to find out is to bind off and block the damn thing, but I’m a pretty slow knitter and a little hesitant to start over again…)